Silvicultural Systems

20 Year old Spruce  Shelterwood. Young Spruce trees in the foreground and mature overstory in the background
20 Year old Spruce Shelterwood.
Young Spruce trees in the foreground and mature overstory in the background

Silvicultural Systems are different ways in which forest professionals plan to extract timber from a forest for various objectives.   Most commonly seen by the public eye are clear cuts while in contrast single tree removal systems may not even be noticed.  To name a few others there are:  seed-tree, shelterwoods, group selection or group retention systems.  The Research forest is a great place to actually see what these harvest systems look like and to explore and discuss the opportunities and challenges of using them.

Forestry Students examine the soil in a partial harvest area
Forestry Students examine the soil in a partial harvest area

UNBC – Danger Tree Removals

The ALRF will be acting on behalf of UNBC Facilities to remove trees that have been identified as dangerous.  These trees are standing dead, diseased, or have otherwise been identified as unstable and could fall causing injury or property damage.

June 8 and 10 crews will be operating around campus to selectively remove these trees.   many of the trees will be chipped and the chips will be used at the BioEnergy plant here on campus.

Some of the upcoming work includes some higher profile trees including:

Aspens by the Administration Building

A number of these trees pre-date the campus construction and unfortunately are now over-mature and the tops are dying.  A number of these trees must be selectively removed for safety reasons.  There are a number of younger trees which will maintain a stand of trees in this location – when these reach the end of their days there is another cohort already filling in behind them.  Some of the branches may be mulched and broadcast on site.  The larger pieces will be chipped and ‘recycled’ as heat through the Bioenergy plant.

Spruce to the south of the Administration Building

The very large spruce tree near the south entrance to the Administration Building is due for an assessment, and quite possibly will have to be removed this spring.  It has been monitored for the past several years and unfortunately the top die-back has been advancing and there is now a significant danger both to persons and the building.

Should you have any questions regarding these activities please contact Colin Chisholm of the Aleza Lake Research Forest at 250-960-6338 or colin.chisholm@unbc.ca